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Click on the links below to explore resources
that have been reviewed and approved by CBSS
(listed in alphabetical order)
AADB (American Association of the Deaf-Blind — www.AADB.org)
  • Who & What: AADB members are deaf-blind individuals from diverse backgrounds, as well as family members, professionals, interpreters, and other interested supporters. The mission of AADB is to ensure that all deaf-blind persons achieve their maximum potential through increased independence, productivity, and integration into the community.
  • Organization Updates: AADB is in the process of updating their bylaws to better reflect the needs of the people served by the organization. For many years, AADB was a membership based group. Now, in an age where fewer people choose to become members of national organizations, a movement has spontaneously come up within AADB by a group of concerned members and supporters who wish to see AADB return to its glory days. This movement is now called ORA or Operation Restore AADB. The mission of ORA is simple: Draft new bylaws that reflect our modern times and push for a full general election of board members and officers in 2015. ORA also aims to reduce the barriers of participation and increase the number of members in the organization. Follow these updates and their progress toward change on their website.
  • Useful resources on their website: Free monthly newsletter; information clearinghouse; advocacy project information.
  • Link: Visit the AADB website here… 
ACB (American Council of the Blind (www.ACB.org)
  • Who & What: The American Council of the Blind strives to increase the independence, security, equality of opportunity, and quality of life, for all blind and visually-impaired people. ACB presents a wide array of media and other materials, including the publication, “The Braille Forum.
  • Useful resources on their website: Resources include guides, and handbooks on everything from college life to accessible voting, a series of White Papers on ACB advocacy, and radio programming. ACB Radio is the first internet radio station in North America operated by people who are blind. The station streams a variety of content, from old time radio to innovative talk shows, music by people who are blind, ACB Reports (monthly audio publications), and shows in a number of foreign languages.
  • Link: Visit the ACB website here… 
AFB (American Federation for the Blind — www.AFB.org)
  • Who & What: AFB is a national non-profit with resources and information for people with vision loss that was created in 1921. Their mission is to  remove barriers, create solutions, and expand possibilities so people with vision loss can achieve their full potential.
  • Useful resources on their website: Information about connecting with others who have visual impairment; information to assist in finding jobs; links to current research, policy, and practice related to blindness; parenting and families issues; and, interactive blog posts.
  • Link: Visit the AFB website here… 
APH (American Printing House for the Blind —  www.APH.org)
  • Who & What: APH is the world’s largest provider of materials that support accessible education and daily living for individuals with vision impairment.
  • Useful resources on their website: Information about blindness and visual impairment; information about toys and gifts for individuals with vision impairment; information about textbooks, software, technology, gadgets, and other resources and support; links to materials in large print or Braille.
  • Link: Visit the APH website here… 
CADRE (www.DirectService.org/CADRE/index.cfm)
National Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution
  • Who & What: The National Center for Appropriate Dispute Resolution (CADRE) website is a project of Direction Service pursuant to Cooperative Agreement CFDA H326X130001 with the Office of Special Education Programs, United States Department of Education. Funded by the U.S. Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), the website offers information and resources in both English and Español for families and providers with the mission of “Encouraging the use of mediation and other collaborative strategies to resolve disagreements about special education and early intervention programs.”
  • Useful information: The opinions expressed and materials contained on the website are intended to support families and providers, but do not necessarily reflect USDE position or policy, and are not necessarily endorsed by the Federal Government.
  • Link: View CADRE webinar recordings here…
  • Link: E-mail cadre@directionservice.org for updates and information, including upcoming CADRE webinars.

Deaf-blind Perspectives (www.Documents.NationalDB.org)
  • Who & What: Deaf-blind Perspectiveis a free publication issued twice a year (Spring and Fall) by The Teaching Research Institute of Western Oregon University, with staffing support from the National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness.
  • Useful information: The resource offers articles, essays, and announcements about topics relevant to people with deaf-blindness. The publication is available in Standard or Large Print, and also in Grade 2 Braille and ASCII (e-mail).
  • Link: Visit the Deaf-blind Perspectives main page here… 
Deaf-blind State Projects — Nationwide
  • Who & What: Since the 1830s, programs and services for students with deaf-blindness have been available in the United States. Since the 196os, in response to the rubella epidemic in this country, the U.S. Government has mandated and supported state programs for children with deaf-blindness.
  • Useful information: The Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) funds a number of programs including a national technical assistance project, a national clearinghouse, several research projects, support for personnel preparation, and state deaf-blind technical assistance programs. CBSS is the Maryland & DC Deaf-blind Project funded by OSEP.The National Center on Deaf-blindness maintains a listing of the state deaf-blind projects nationwide.
  • Link: Visit the NCDB State Projects page here… 
  • Article: View the NCDB history of deaf-blindness services and education trends document here… 
Family Leadership Project — www.FamiliesLead.org
  • Who & What: The Family Leadership Project, a new web tool  is now available to help you as you support family engagement activities. The web tool offers information on family leadership, learning materials, and training. It also introduces visitors to family leaders, powerful family stories, and more. Specific planning tools include research and support, planning activities, participant recruitment, individual training events, evaluation, and participant action planning.
  • Why: The website is filled with resources that can support the provision of technical assistance to families in a variety of ways. It houses an array of materials and strategies organized to enhance planning efforts when designing parent leadership training activities. It offers tools for parent leaders interested in promoting leadership skills in other parents and family members and provides a foundation for any individual parent or family member seeking to become more effective in their advocacy skills.
  • Useful Information: This website is a community effort. It is a collection of ideas and resources shared by many who have networked together. The organizers hope this website will continue to grow as others contribute materials found to be effective in promoting family leadership.
  • Support: A website tour from the December 2014 launch event will be available in video recording and screen readable HTML transcript on the NCDB website after the December 18, 2014 webinar.
  • Link: Visit the Family Leadership Project here… 
The Hadley School for the Blind — Family Education Program (www.Hadley.edu)
  • Who & What: The Hadley School for the Blind’s Family Education Program includes a number of tuition-free distance technology courses to help busy parents support their children who are blind or visually impaired. Instructors provide personalized, one-on-one instruction and advice and are available by phone, e-mail, fax, or online. They also can provide information and referrals to other professionals in the died.
  • Useful resources about Hadley: Courses include Braille and Your Baby or Toddler, Learning Through Play, and You, Your Child and Your Community.
  • Link: For a full list of courses focused on early childhood and school-aged children, visit www.Hadley.edu and click on Family Education Program.
Helen Keller National Center (HKNC — www.HKNC.org)
  • Who & What: The mission of the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-blind Youths and Adults is “to enable each person who is deaf-blind to live, work, and thrive in their community of choice.” HKNC provides a two-week summer institute for youth applicants aged 15 through 22 years: who have both vision and hearing loss; who have a formal communication system; who are on a career path to work, technical school, or college. Presenters who are positive role models and mentors with deaf-blindness address topics related to transition, self-determination, technology, social skills, and self-advocacy.
  • Special Note: HKNC is a CBSS Partner for the Summer Youth Seminar.
  • Useful resources on their website: Information for individuals of all ages with deaf-blindness can be found on their website, including resources for technology, research, and employment opportunities.
  • Link: Visit the HKNC website here… 
iCanConnect — (www.iCanConnect.org)
  • Who  & What: iCanConnect is the National Deaf-blind Equipment Distribution Program. Their goal is to ensure that every person with combined hearing and vision loss has access o modern communication tools and the training necessary to use these tools. They support those with deaf-blindness with opportunities to connect and interact with the world, and to be a contributing member of society.
  • Useful resources on their website: iCanConnect provides outreach, assessments, telecommunications technology, and training free of charge to those who meet federal eligibility guidelines.
  • Link: Visit the iCanConnect website here… 
Laurent Cleric National Deaf Education Center — www.Gallaudet.edu/clerc_center.html
  • Who  & What: The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University provides information, training, and technical assistance for parents and professionals to meet the needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. Their mission is to improve the quality of education afforded to deaf and hard of hearing students from birth to age 21 throughout the United States.
  • Useful Information: The Clerc Center maintains two demonstration schools — Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES is a CBSS Partner) and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf.
  • Link: Visit the Laurent Cleric National Center website here… 
Métier Services, Inc (MSI) — www.MetierInc.org
  • Who & What: Métier Services, Inc (MSI) is a team of individuals with a goal of supporting, developing, and sustaining programs that are aimed at promoting skills required to gain employment and economic independence within the blind community. From their website — “According to recent estimates, as many as 7 out of 10 individuals who are blind or visually impaired are unemployed or underemployed in the United States. Metier Services Incorporated (MSI) was founded to reduce these statistics by enhancing the opportunities for economic and personal independence of people who are blind, primarily through creating, sustaining and improving employment opportunities within the blind community. MSI is not only focused on creating jobs – but on developing employee careers through challenging, knowledge-based positions in high-energy, high tempo, quality work environments.”
  • Useful resources on their website: MSI offers a variety of services, including employment services, technical training, and community services. Their website services page details information and support available, including education (early intervention, O&M, TVI, assistive technology training, transition program), rehabilitation (O&M, VRT, AT, deafblind), employment (job readiness, specialized skills training, workplace technology training, AbilityOne Program, job placement support), and community support (service coordination, sports and recreation, support groups).
  • Link: Visit the MSI website here… 
NCDB (National Center on Deaf-Blindess — www.NationalDB.org)
  • Who & What: NCDB is a national technical assistance center funded by the federal Department of Education. Their mission is improve the quality of life for children who are deaf-blind and their families. They identify priorities for practice and research, they encourage innovative practice and policy, and they maintain a rich repository of content related to the deaf-blind community.
  • Useful resources on their website: Information specific to children with deaf-blindness; national Child Count data and mapping; information on NCDB initiatives including IntervenersEarly IdentificationTechnology SolutionsFamily Engagement, and Literacy.
  • Link: Visit the NCDB website here… 
NFADB (National Family Association for Deaf-Blind — www.NFADB.org)
  • Who & What: NFADB is the largest non-profit national organization of families of individuals who are deaf-blind. They believe that individuals who are deaf-blind are valued members of society and entitled to the same opportunities and choices as others, and therefore provide information and resources related to advocacy.
  • Useful resources on their website: Webinars and newsletters (current and archived); information about national equipment distribution.
  • Link: Visit the NFADB website here… 
  • E-mail: NFADBinfo@gmail.com
NYDBC Monthly Webinar Series
  • Who & What: The New York Deaf Blind Collaborative is the NY State Deaf-blind Project — comparable to the Maryland & DC Deaf-blind Project (Connections Beyond Sight and Sound) — offers free online educational webinars each month. NYDBC’s monthly webinar series is usually offered on the 3rd Thursday of the month from 3:15 pm – 4:30 pm EST. These educational progress are free, and Certificates of Attendance will be provided upon request.
  • Useful resource information: Spring 2014 webinar topics include include Enhancing Parent-Professional Partnerships (Feb), Increasing Advocacy Skills (Feb), Related Service Providers (March), Transition (April), and Instructional Practice (May). Most of the webinars are recorded for viewing at later times — check the NYDBC website for details.
  • Recent webinar recordings (75 min each, available for online viewing, free):
    “Service Provision Across Disciplines”
     —- >  http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/p8xjxc0uzfh/
    “Early Identification & Referral of Children with Dual Sensory Loss”
     —- > http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/p3ls5olmrdy/ 
    “Enhancing Parent-Professional Collaborations”
     —- > http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/p5jyubbb0nn/
    “Increasing Advocacy Skills”
     —- > http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/p925qnvy4eg/
    “Understanding the Role & Function of an Intervener”
     —- > http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/p8gjcjgah1u/
    “Transition Planning for Young Adults who are Deaf-Blind”
     —- > http://tadnet.adobeconnect.com/p26qndk84ge/
  • Link: For registration and information e-mail nydbc@qc.cuny.edu.
ODR (Office of Disability Rights DC Office –– www.ODR.DC.gov)
  • Who & What: The mission of the DC Office of Disability Rights (ODR) is to ensure that the programs, services, benefits, activities and facilities operated or funded by the District of Columbia are fully accessible to, and useable by people with disabilities. ODR is committed to inclusion, community-based services, and self-determination for people with disabilities. ODR is responsible for overseeing the implementation of the City’s obligations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as well as other disability rights laws.
  • Useful resources on their website: The ODR website includes resource guides for home and community living, basic handbooks on ADA, manuals on accommodating employees, information on conducting inclusive meetings, a web accessibility guide and more.
  • Video link: Disability Sensitivity Training & Tips — a brief, humorous, informational video from the Office of Disability Rights (Features CBSS Advisory Committee member, Paul Khouri).
    —> Watch the video here… 
  • Link: Visit the ODR DC website here… 
OSEP (Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services — www.ED.gov)
  • Who & What: OSEP is dedicated to improving results for infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities ages birth through 21 by providing leadership and financial support to assist states and local districts in educating these students.
  • Useful resources on their website: Information about education initiatives and priorities; teaching resources by subject and category (animation, documents, photos, videos).
  • Link: Visit the OSEP website here… 
Perkins (www.Perkins.org)
  • Who & What: Perkins School for the Blind provides education and services for children and adults around the world who are blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired. Since 1832, Perkins has worked to be a innovative leader in serving people with visual impairments, supporting their students in the classroom, the community, and around the world.
  • Useful resources on their website: Information about Perkins School, community and international programs, living with vision loss, teaching resources and more can be found on the Perkins’ website.
  • Link: Visit the Perkins website here… 
RESNA (Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology — www.RESNA.org)
  • Who & What: The Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America is a professional organization dedicated to promoting the health and well-being of people with disabilities through increasing access to technology solutions. RESNA offers certification, continuing education, and professional development; they assistive technology standards and promote research and public policy; and, they sponsor forums for the exchange of information and ideas.
  • Useful resources on their website: Information on their website includes definitions for various assistive technology terms, listings of assistive technology standards, and conference proceedings and news reports.
  • Link: Visit the RESNA website here… 
West Virginia Assistive Technology System (WVATS — www.WVATS.CEDWVU.org)
  • Who & What: The West Virginia Assistive Technology System (WVATS) is the designated lead agency that works to enhance the lives of all West Virginia residents with disabilities, including the families of people with disabilities. By providing access to and help with the acquisition of assistive technology devices and services, WVATS can offer West Virginians with disabilities an opportunity for choice, control and independence at home, work, school, play, and in their neighborhoods.
  • Useful resources on their website: Many of their online resources (e.g, factsheets, recreation guides, housing guides, and a quarterly newsletter filled with practical and topical information) can be useful tools and tips for people across the country.
  • Link: Link to the WVATS main page here… 
World Federation of the Deafblind (www.WFDB.eu)
  • Who & What: The World Federation of the Deafblind (WFDB) is a small is a global non-governmental advocacy organization by and for people with deafblindness. WFDB was established in 2001 and consists today of 75 national and associated member organizations from 62 different countries from all corners of the world. WFDB aims to improve the quality of life of people with deafblindness worldwide, with the objective of achieving their equal rights and equal opportunities in all areas of society, to be a worldwide forum for the exchange of knowledge and experiences in the area of deafblindness, and to increase international solidarity among organizations of people with deafblindness.
  • Useful resources on their website: In addition to basic information about deafblindness, the WFDB website offers links to other global organizations that provide support or resources for the deafblind community, including a political forum for advocacy and change.
  • Link: Visit the WFDB website here… 
WrightsLaw (www.WrightsLaw.com)
  • Who & What: WrightsLaw is a resource for families, educators, advocates, and others who are seeking accurate and reliable information about special education law and advocacy for children with disabilities.
  • Useful resources on their website: A free weekly newsletter is available, as well as information about local training and outreach activities to support families across the country.
  • Link: Visit the Wrights Law website here… 
Zero to Three — www.ZeroToThree.org

 

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